Student newspaper boss stresses about job even more now

     It was my sophomore year, and I had spent nearly eight months in anticipation of being a part of The Candidate, so I was pretty happy I was able to get on staff.

     When I learned about the position of editor in chief, it was my mission to have that title my senior year.

     I wanted the top spot on The Candidate and I got it.

However, there was no way I could have predicted the hot mess that was coming.

    As exciting and honorable as it was to be named editor in chief, it was also scary.

                                                            COVID-19 is impacting lives in so many ways, and that all started near the end of                                                                  my junior year when we had to go all online. It simply felt like nobody knew what to

                                                            do or what to expect.

     Over the summer, the thought of school being online again for my senior year and not knowing how the administration planned to move forward made me feel uneasy to say the least.

     Add to that I was going to be in charge of a publication during a pandemic; my stress level was at an all-time high.

    At the start of this school year, my senior year, I was the only person on staff with any experience in journalism, plus it is uncharacteristic of me to speak-up in group settings.

     Being in charge is out of my comfort zone, so even though it is an honor, it is also anxiety-inducing.

   The thought of having to direct a group of people and help them while also having to focus on my assignments was, and still is, overwhelming.

There is a lot for me to keep track of, which can get confusing very quickly if not done well.

  The alternating days are not helpful either because it is more difficult to build staff unity.

  Having some of the staff at home and others in the building is challenging because editors are supposed to be there when questions come up.

   I guess I should be happy that at least we are all able to work together online, but it is not even close to being the same. Technology can do a lot, but it can never match the feeling of being physically present in a workshop class.

   Sitting at home, looking at a laptop while interacting with students that I should be in class with is just strange.

   Honestly, the entire world is very strange and scary right now.

  It is so off-putting with the mandatory masks, attending school every other day and the block scheduling; heck, even the teachers were switching rooms at the beginning.

  The strict guidelines students and faculty have to follow to help make everybody as safe as possibly is necessary, but it certainly does not make things easier.

   I know things could be worse, but things could be better as well.

     It is an overwhelming feeling knowing I have to call the shots, strategize and figure everything out during a pandemic.

    It is different and I want normal life back, but I know it is not going to happen. This is our new normal.

I am proud to have this title, however. I need to remember that.

  Two years ago I would have been ecstatic over the thought of it.

    These circumstances are not something I want to work around, but that is reality right now. I certainly know it could be much worse.

COVID-19

A Column by Emily Perkins

FASHIONABLY FATIGUED

     Haddaway, a Trinidadian-born German vocalist and musician once said “What is love? Oh baby, don’t hurt me, don’t hurt me, no more” and that is the real question.

      What is love?

    Well the definition of love says love is an intense feeling of deep affection. Love has no correct meaning and I honestly do not believe there ever will be one.

      Love to me is finding someone who cares and sees a strong connection or has feelings for someone.

        When we love someone we experience the same positive thoughts and experiences as when we like a person.         

     But we also experience a deep sense of caring and commitment towards that person. Sometimes people think they love someone when they really are just “in love” with that person.

     Falling in love with someone is easy, and trust me, I have done it before, but bumping into someone that can spark one's soul is rare. Finding someone who generally loves someone for who they are is so special. It is important to find someone who makes that person feel safe and at home and I have found them.

     When someone in one’s life is very important to them, one might say they are “your yellow” meaning they are very special.

     The term “my yellow” is used to describe someone who makes someone happy and who someone cherishes.

     It describes someone who has saved you at your darkest times.

     In my life I have found “my yellow." I am so grateful for my person.

     They have really shown me what true love is. They have helped me so much. From being stressed because of school to crying at night, they have been by my side the whole time.

     They have really helped me with all my struggles. He never gives up on me and I am so grateful for him. I just know that he is the one for me, and I know we are just kids, but I really do love him.

       In every relationship, there are problems, and not every relationship is perfect.

      In my relationship, we have had our ups and downs, but we always work it out. We do not ever give up on each other. We always know what is best and how to fix our problems.

    In a relationship, there are positives and negatives. To have more positives, just always communicate and be honest. It is what makes a good relationship; it is what love is about.

A Column by Emalee Paskiewicz

FIND YOUR YELLOW

Sophomore appreciates

the value of finding that special someone

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